Friday, May 25, 2012

#WVTP Update

So yesterday was the before mentioned #WVTP extravaganza that consumed my day between the hours of 11am and 5pm central time.

The day started out like any other day in the Nego household. I got up, I fed a kid, I got some coffee, and I opened my computer. In the hours before the moment of commencement, a strange calm came over me. And no, I didn't spike my coffee (though the thought did cross my mind). I spent some time revising my query letter and synopsis and was feeling good. The babe went down for her nap promptly at 10:30 and I was ready.

At 11am Twitter exploded in a # frenzy to post pitches from around the world. If you were on twitter at that time, I apologize because your stream probably felt a little spammed. In fact, the # was so popular it was actually trending enough to draw real spammers. (As a side note, we all felt that some of those spams would have made lovely pitches).

I pitched my book and waited...and waited...and waited.  When it sank far enough down the list to be completely invisible (about 30 minutes later) I decided to re-post. This is when I learned something new about Twitter. Apparently you can't tweet the same thing twice. I even tried to use buffer to get around this rule, but was thwarted in my evil plan. What! Now I had to tweak the pitch I'd worked tirelessly to perfect.

Well, as long as I had to change it I figured I might as well try out a few things. Below is the list of all the different pitches I tried.

  1. 1. 16 y.o. mind reader, Stacie, could spy on her hot neighbor, but fending off total annihilation is probably a  better use of her time.
  2. 16 y/o mind reader, Stacie, could spy on her hot neighbor, but fending off total annihilation is probably a better use of her time. 
  3. New girl, Stacie, just inherited mind reading powers and a part in an ancient power struggle. She’d rather have a homecoming date.  
  4. 16 year old, Stacie, just inherited mind reading powers and a part in an ancient power struggle. She’d rather have a homecoming date.
  5. When you’re a teenaged mind reader in small town Ohio, the question isn’t if humans mutilated by evil desires will find you, but when.
  6. Stacie's head is filled with dreams of Charles and the thoughts of half the town. She must filter them all out to listen to her heart.
  7. 16 year old mind reader, Stacie, could spy on her hot neighbor, but fighting the forces of evil is probably a better use of her time.
  8. Evil mutants are hot on her trail and the hottie next door is giving her the cold shoulder. Welcome to Loveland, Stacie Gunthar.
  9. YA Evil's hot on her trail and the hottie next door is giving her the cold shoulder. Welcome to Loveland, Stacie Gunthar.
To clarify John made a note that he was picking up several manuscripts that he didn't realize were YA. So just in case he somehow missed one of my previous tweets spelling out that my MC is 16, I thought I'd clarify the point in the last effort.

I hit the send button, closed my eyes and waited. Then at the eleventh hour when it seemed as if all hope was lost and I would leave the day without a single manuscript request, I opened my eyes to stare at my computer screen and...



Nothing.

That's right. Nothing. I'm not gonna lie. It hurt. I was disappointed and momentarily discouraged. It's times like these that I lean on Dolly Parton who said, "Find out who you are, and do it on purpose." Because, I'm a writer, and that's what I'm doing.  So yesterday wasn't my day to shine. It happens. Does that mean I'm ready to throw in the towel. Absolutely not. It means, yesterday wasn't my day. That's all.

Even though it's tempting, we can't hang our careers (or even a single manuscript) on the outcome of one attempt. So now what? Now I keep going. I found out today that I won a raffle for a query critique. So off it goes and hopefully I get some feedback to help make my query stand out when I start submissions.

Rejection and disappointment are an inevitable part of every writer's career. How we deal with that rejection plays a major role in our future success.


11 comments:

  1. bummer. It looks like you got really creative though...(I like #8.) It's going to get picked up (because it's good!)...you just have to pay your writer's dues first, right??? (((hugs)))

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  2. Thanks, Christi. 8 has become one of my favorites, too.

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  3. "Rejection and disappointment are an inevitable part of every writer's career. How we deal with that rejection plays a major role in our future success."

    EXACTLY!! And you are picking yourself up and moving on, which means you're cut out for this roller coaster of a business. :)

    I've never been one to participate in pitchfest type things because there are always SO MANY people that the ones listening to the pitches have got to get overwhelmed at some point. So I focused my energy on researching agents and addressing them specifically in my queries. It was more work, but I ended up with an agent who is *perfect* for me. We've been together two and a half years now, even with no sale yet, and she still believes in me. So all that work paid off. :)

    Good luck with your query critique! And your pitches sounded really interesting! I'll bet you get some requests soon.

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    1. Thanks, Tabitha. It was a bit chaotic. I'm crossing my fingers that your hard work will pay off soon. We just have to keep pushing.

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  4. The important thing is you put yourself out there and did it. Be proud of that.

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    1. We have to take that first step at some point. :)

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  5. you're brave to share your story and should be proud of that as well! I don't think anyone gets picked up on their first attempt. this is a hard biz to get noticed in and I have to think that a twitter pitch session is not your best chance to shine. I think you story and tone sound awesome and now you've just got to find the right agent (who maybe didn't even do the twitter pitch) to query.

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  6. Keep on. Stay the course. You'll get there.

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  7. Yes, I agree, it's the NORM to be rejected (or more like, ignored) as a writer. Pick your battle and the places to be rejected (or ignored). A twitterfest means the odds are pretty much against you (so much competition). Just keep on writing and sending out to agents. Whatever you do - don't give up!

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  8. Dolly is a genius. Kudos to you for trying not giving up.

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  9. It is so hard to bounce back after all the rejections in this business. But I truly believe that each rejection brings you that much closer to an acceptance. You just have to keep going and hang in long enough to get there. <3

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